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 How Chatter Matters in TV Viewing

Please contact Linda LaVigne with any questions or for more information at linda@ctam.com or at 301.485.8923.

PDF version (email / fax)

Overview

 

Today, social TV has a whole new meaning. The days of waiting to talk about last night’s TV shows around the water cooler are over. Right at their fingertips (or thumbs), viewers can now use a variety of devices and platforms to chat about programming as it airs. From co-viewing with friends/family to texting, tweeting, downloading apps or visiting online blogs, social TV has expanded beyond the physical space into the virtual world of the digital age. So, how do social interactions and chatter impact and augment TV viewing, brand loyalty and engagement?

The 2012 CTAM co-op study, How Chatter Matters in TV Viewing, investigates the various forms of social and live interaction, including co-viewing behavior, stand-alone and second-screen apps, texting, blogging, and social media activities, as it relates to television and programming. This study will further explore these behaviors including what social viewers chat about, with whom, on what platform, and how it enhances or detracts from their television experience.

This study will explore:

  • The impact of chatter and social interactions (both online and offline) on TV engagement and tune-in behavior;
  • The platforms and services used to chat about TV shows/movies, such as apps, texting, social media (Facebook, Twitter), and online blogs;
  • How social viewing varies based on the platform through which consumers watch TV shows and movies;
  • Types of genres and television shows that promote social viewing and engagement;
  • How often social interactions and chatter occur related to television and when social viewers are most likely to engage in these spaces surrounding television;
  • The degree to which emerging technologies, services and social platforms impact engagement with television viewing and whether they enhance or detract from the TV experience;
  • The most common “second screens” used for engaging in chatter while also watching TV, and what the “first screen” typically is in these situations;
  • Profiles of social viewers (both active and passive), how influential they are in creating buzz, and how best to reach them.
     

Segments:

The level of activity and involvement in chatter in the social TV space varies among social viewers. Therefore, to fully understand these various engagement levels, the study will further investigate the following segments:

  • Spectrum of Social TV Users
  • Heavy, medium and low social media users as it relates to TV shows and TV-related content
  • Active social TV participants vs. passive/observers
  • Social TV attitudes (information junkie, first to tell others something new, people look to me for recommendations)



  • By Age Groups:
  • Teens, 13-17 (Teen report and analytics conducted by uSamp) 
  • A18-34
  • A35-49
  • A50-64
  • By Technology Ownership and Usage (i.e. tablets, smartphones, Xbox, laptops, etc.):




     

MBI TouchPoints:

This study will integrate MBI TouchPoints data on how moods, needs states, environmental context and psychographics affect co-viewing behavior and social interactions. More specifically, this study will include:

  • Impact of social interaction on the overall TV Experience (solitary vs. social viewing and links to higher engagement)
  • Identify specific social interactions and their position in the ‘ecosystem’
  • Impact of social interactions on awareness, trial and immediacy of viewing behavior

Click here for more information on MBI TouchPoints.
 

Deliverables:

By subscribing to the study, you will receive the following deliverables:

  • Full set of banners from the quantitative survey among both A18-64 and teens 13-17
  • Executive Report: An executive briefing ideal for presenting executives, marketers and advertisers with a snapshot of the study’s key findings.
  • Two Full Comprehensive Reports: Two full report, including topline executive summaries, in-depth analysis and integrated graphics among adults 18-64 and teens 13-17.
  • Qualitative Report: Detailed report on key findings from the one-on-one consumer interviews with integrated quotes and respondent details.
  • Exclusive Webcast Presentation: Highlighting key findings and profiles, with a Q&A session including social analysts and experts.

 

Share Key Findings with Your Co-Workers
All employees from subscribing companies are invited to participate in this exclusive webcast, highlighting key findings, actionable insights, as well as a Q&A session with social analysts and experts.

Methodology:

These are three-phases for this research, Phase I: Qualitative one-on-one consumer interviews, Phase II: Quantitative online survey among A18-64 and Phase III: Quantitative online survey among teens 13-17.

Phase I: Qualitative

  • 90 minute one-on-one/in-depth interviews were conducted among 13 consumers, ages 18-54
  • Those who qualified to participated were those who:
  • Watched at least 10 hours of television programming in a typical week;
  • Have talked about, shared or engaged in social discussions online about a TV show or TV show-related content.

       Exercises:

  • Situational decision making exercise
  • Projective storytelling exercises
  • Direct interaction with devices

 

Phase II: Quantitative: A18-64

  • Online survey, conducted September 2012
  • 800 total interviews were conducted
  • 18 to 64 years 
  • 50% men, 50% women
  • Mix of cable, satellite, telco and non-multichannel subscribers
  • Must watch at least 5+ hours of TV programming content (i.e. full-length TV shows) in a typical week
  • Those who engage in social interactions around TV shows either online or through word-of-mouth.

Phase III: Quantitative: Teens 13-17

  • Online survey, conducted October 2012
  • 400 total interviews
  • 50% men, 50% women
  • Mix of cable, satellite, telco and non-multichannel subscribers
  • Must watch at least 5+ hours of TV programming content (i.e. full-length TV shows) in a typical week
  • Those who engage in social interactions around TV shows either online or through word-of-mouth.



Available November.

Please contact Linda LaVigne with any questions or for more information at linda@ctam.com or at 301.485.8923.

PDF version (email / fax)

Developed by the CTAM Research Committee in conjunction with:


*Teen report conducted and analyzed by uSamp.