CTAM Think

Professor Telang is broadly interested in how Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and associated digitization of information impact consumers, business and policies. Within this thread, his interest lies in two major domains. First is Digital Media Industry with a particular focus on how digitization (and associated piracy) in copyrighted industries is affecting the incentives of content provider, distributors and users. His research is directed towards understanding and shaping an optimal copyright and intellectual property policy in the Digitization Era.

He is a co-director of a center IDEA (Initiative for Digital Entertainment Analytics), working extensively with industry and policy makers on variety of issue surrounding digitization of Media.  He also does extensive consulting on this topic and has written a popular book.

His second area of work is on economics of information security and privacy and understanding the incentives of various parties (users, firms and hackers), why markets fail, how to create a useful policy framework and how to measure the effectiveness of such policies. His work explored the controversy surrounding vulnerability disclosure, vulnerability markets and their role in generating optimal outcomes. Recently, he has been examining the role of data breach disclosure laws on identity thefts.

Interviews and Videos

Big Data & Netflix
(Interview)

Streaming, Sharing, Stealing:
Big Data and the Future of Entertainment

Author

Streaming, Sharing, Stealing: Big Data and the Future of Entertainment

In a period of unprecedented technological disruption in entertainment industries, discover how companies like Netflix, Amazon and Apple are changing the rules. Just about everything is affected: pricing, production, distribution, piracy. Smith and Telang discuss niche products and the long tail, product differentiation, price discrimination, and incentives for users not to steal content. To survive and succeed, businesses have to adapt rapidly and creatively.

How can companies discover who their customers are, what they want, and how much they are willing to pay for it? Data. The entertainment industries, must learn to play a little “moneyball.” The bottom line: follow the data.

Achievements and Honors

  • Recipient of Sloan Foundation Industry Study fellowship
  • Honored with a number of Google Faculty awards
  • Recipient of NSF CAREER award for his work on economics of information security
  • Part of Cylab and Institute for Infrastructure Protection (I3P)